Health

Caregiver Depression: Prevention Counts

Caregiving can be physically and emotionally stressful. To provide the best care possible, you might put your loved one’s needs before your own. In turn, you could develop feelings of sadness, anger, and loneliness, as well as guilt. Sometimes, these emotions trigger caregiver depression.

What are the symptoms of caregiver depression?

Everyone has a bad day sometimes. However, depression is more than just a bout of the blues. It is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. During an episode of depression, symptoms occur most of the day, nearly every day, and might include:

  • Feelings of sadness, tearfulness, emptiness, or hopelessness
  • Angry outbursts, irritability, or frustration, even over small matters
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in most or all normal activities, such as sex, hobbies, or sports
  • Sleep disturbances, including insomnia or sleeping too much
  • Tiredness and a lack of energy, so even small tasks take extra effort
  • Changes in appetite—often reduced appetite and weight loss, but increased cravings for food and weight gain in some people
  • Anxiety, agitation, or restlessness
  • Slowed thinking, speaking, or body movements
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt, fixating on past failures, or blaming yourself for things that aren’t your responsibility
  • Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions, and remembering things
  • Frequent or recurrent thoughts of death, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, or suicide
  • Unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches

What can I do if I develop caregiver depression?

If you’re experiencing signs or symptoms of caregiver depression, consult your doctor or a mental health provider. Depression isn’t a weakness and you can’t simply “snap out” of it. It can also affect the quality of care you’re able to provide for your loved one. However, most people who have depression feel better with the help of medication, psychological counseling, or other treatment.

What can I do to prevent caregiver depression?

You can take steps to prevent caregiver depression. For example:

  • Reach out for help. Don’t wait until you feel overwhelmed to ask for help caring for a loved one. If possible, get your whole family and close friends involved in planning and providing care. Seek out respite services and a caregiver support group. A support network can keep you from feeling isolated, depleted, and depressed.
  • Keep up other relationships. Caregiving can take time away from replenishing personal relationships—but showing loved ones and friends you care about them can give you strength and hope.
  • Start a journal. Journaling can improve your mood by allowing you to express pain, anger, fear, or other emotions.
  • Take time for yourself. Participate in activities that allow you to relax and have fun. Go to a movie, watch a ballgame, or attend a birthday party or religious gathering. Regular physical activity and meditation also can help reduce stress. Aim to get plenty of sleep and eat a healthy diet.
  • Stay positive. Caregiving allows you to give something back and make a difference in your loved one’s life. Caregiving might also have spiritual meaning for you. Focus on these positive aspects of caregiving to help prevent depression.

Remember, if you think you’re depressed, seek help. Proper treatment can help you feel your best.

Updated: 2016-07-22

Publication Date: 2010-07-09

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